Coko and Hindawi

for immediate release…

https://about.hindawi.com/opinion/hindawi-partners-with-the-collaborative-knowledge-foundation-to-develop-open-science-tools/

and

Hindawi Limited & Coko Announce Partnership

Which means we are partnering with key Open Access publishers eLife and Hindawi…pretty cool!

Working on xpub

Much is going on in the Coko world at the moment and a lot of news coming out soon about various collaborations. Much of the attention has been around xpub, the journal system we have been working on built on top of PubSweet.

PubSweet is, of course, a component based system so you can ‘roll your own’ journal or book platform from existing components. We are making a lot of components for both Editoria and xpub and publishing them for reuse with an open source (MIT) license.

Some of the components we are generating for xpub are coming out of the work we are doing with Collabra, the UCP Psychology Journal. Today the Managing Editor, Dan Morgan, and I met for another session working out the logic of the components and how they fit together.

dan2

We started by working through the flow from the perspectives of each of the major stakeholders – Managing Editor, Senior Editor, Handling Editor, Author, Reviewer. We worked out what they each needed to see on the dashboard and then went through their workflow and what they needed from each component.

List of what each actor sees on their dashboard
List of what each actor sees on their dashboard
Mapping out the flow across components.
Mapping out the flow across components.
Sketches of components
Sketches of components

We then took each of these small mappings and transferred them to larger pieces of paper. Drawing the interfaces in basic form.

Drawing out the components in detail
Drawing out the components in detail

Each of the diagrams are detailed below.

dash

sub

managereview

review

decision

We had already worked out this structure. Today was about running through the logic from each actor’s point of view. Good news is, the logic held up and validated the architecture. Good news! So, what you see in these pics is more or less what we will build. It is a thin horizontal slice that covers the complete lifecycle of a manuscript going through the Collabra process. We’ll build it and test it, and then layer on additional functionality.

Next I’ll recreate these in digital graphics and add a page of bullet points for explanation. We will then meet with the Coko team and talk it through and start building! It’s a good way to design systems, way better than endless months gathering pages and pages of product requirements. It’s a lightweight and fun process. Software is a conversation after all!

What version is it anyway?

We are currently building multiple systems which are all component based. PubSweet, for example, contains three softwares (which you can find here):

  • pubsweet-server
  • pubsweet-client
  • pubsweet-cli

In addition, Editoria, is built on top of PubSweet and it consists of at least the following standalone components (which you can find here):

  • editoria
  • editoria-dashboard
  • editoria-bookbuilder
  • wax-editor

To the end user these platforms appear ‘as one thing’ but in effect, they are made of multiple standalone moving parts which are mostly all legitimately within the same namespace (editoria-*)

Which brings about a few interesting questions – the first is regarding versions, the second about what exactly it is that we are building.

First – how do you version something like Editoria when the ‘bona fide’ Editoria repository is ‘just glue’ code that brings the other Editoria components together? Each of those components has different version numbers that advance in a rather traditional semver way, but the actual Editoria glue code won’t move much at all. Hence we need to find a good way to think about versioning that communicates forward movement to the outside world.

So, for this situation, we have decided to simply advance the minor number of the version for each significant feature (or group of features) added to the system at large. So, for example, Editoria is now at 1.0. When we add the multiple MS Word import and the diacritics interface we will advance it to 1.1 – this is kind of arbitrary but as long as we correctly version the other components I think its the best way to do it.

xpub offers a different challenge. xpub started as the working title of journal platform (Manuscript Submission System) built on top of PubSweet. However, we quickly realised that xpub is actually more of a ‘ecology’ of components that can be used to build a journal workflow than it is a journal platform. Our thinking is moving this way because we aren’t really building platforms so much as components that can be assembled into platforms. So we don’t wish to have a single ‘xpub journal platform’, rather we will build many components (just like Editoria) and name them with the xpub-* prefix eg. xpub-dash, xpub-submission etc. These components can then be ‘glued together’ to make the journal platform of your dreams…

Just to make it more complex….we are also breaking down what we now call components into UI libraries…so we will also have an xpub-UI-library which contains ‘sub components’ that are then assembled into a component. For example, what we would call xpub-dash is a component, but it is assembled from several xpub-UI-library sub-components like ‘upload button’, ‘article list’ etc…

When we assemble xpub parts into a journal we will then name it something like xpub-collabra (the first assemblage we will be working on)…

So…you can see the difficulty! How to think about what it is you are building, and, how to version something like xpub-collabra when it is really nothing but the glue code which connects a lot of separate xpub-components which in themselves are assembled from xpub-UI-library sub-components!!!!

Tricky!